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Architects are offering solutions for crowded hospitals

Architects have designed inflatable hospitals! They can be built anywhere

Nela Štefanová
27.Apr 2020
+ Add on Seznam.cz
2 minutes to read

Despite the fact that emergency measures are gradually being lifted in the Czech Republic and it seems that the toughest battle against the coronavirus is behind us, other countries are far from winning the fight. The large-scale epidemic affected mainly the health care infrastructure. Many hospitals, such as those in Italy and New York, soon exceeded their capacity. And it was the shortage of hospital beds that architects from all over the world began to respond to. They focused their "know-how" on designing efficient and most importantly mobile hospitals, which could be built in a short time. Let's have a look together at a couple of suggestions of various flexible cells.

It's hard to believe. While in the Czech Republic, travel abroad has been allowed and the government has lifted restrictions on the free movement of people, some countries, such as the United States, are complaining about overcrowded hospitals and a lack of beds for patients with COVID-19. When I read all those articles about the peak of the pandemic in the United States, where you won't be admitted to the hospital when you come there seeking help, either because of full capacity or because you don't have health insurance, I am all the more happy that I live here in our country in these times. The situation with overcrowded medical facilities around the world has been keeping a number of architects up at night. They therefore decided to pitch in towards a common good and help design several mobile medical device projects that could solve the problem.

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Source: rawpixel.com

Luxusní vila na prodej - Klánovice - 465m
Luxusní vila na prodej - Klánovice - 465m, Praha 9

Rooms not only for patients

The concept of an "inflatable" house called JUPE was originally intended by entrepreneur Jeff Wilson and Cameron Blizzard as a shelter from impending natural disasters. However, when the coronavirus pandemic struck, the gentlemen realized that they needed to adapt their startup to the situation at hand as soon as possible. They hastily created the world's first independent intensive care unit, which can be "unfolded" virtually anywhere in case of need.

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Source: jupe.com

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Source: jupe.com

JUPE rooms can be used in a total of three versions. JUPE Rest offers relaxation for doctors and medical staff, who are often on the verge of their strength. The room has a bed, air conditioning, Wi-fi and of course noise walls. Another version is JUPE Care, which offers room for patients with COVID-19 who are not in critical condition. Next to a bed, this chamber is also equipped with essentials such as a washbasin, a shower or a toilet and enables to connect the patient to a pulmonary ventilator. The latest version is JUPE Plus - a standalone intensive care unit.

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Source: jupe.com

An inflatable bubble

In the ongoing war against coronavirus, it is absolutely necessary for medical staff to be adequately equipped and, above all, well protected. That's why Plastique Fantastique has designed a mobile screening area from which doctors can safely treat patients.

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Source: plastique-fantastique.de

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Source: instagram: plastique-fantastique.de

The advantage of this inflatable bubble, which provides enough space for medical equipment inside, is that it won't let any contaminated air in thanks to an internal fan. One transparent design bubble has a size of 4 x 8 meters. Another advantage of this "invention" is that the plastic bubble can be connected together with multiple units to form a long passage.

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Source: plastique-fantastique.de

An environmentally friendly hospital

We in LP-life.cz think that the last project worth mentioning is the one from the workshop of MMW Architects. The company has developed a flexible hospital from recycled transport containers and inflatable fabrics. The architects consulted the plans for this hospital with leading doctors, so it's not at all surprising that, for example, the external spaces are designed so that ambulances can bring the patient directly into the room without the person having to move around the hospital corridor. If implemented, this model would by powered by solar energy, which would also make a significant contribution to the environment.

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Source: archello.com, mmw architects

Open in gallery (9)
Source: archello.com, mmw architects

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